Politics

Trump Holds First CCP Virus Briefing in Weeks, Calls on Americans to Wear a Mask

President Donald Trump on Tuesday evening resumed giving regular COVID-19 briefings, coming weeks after they were discontinued.

Americans should wear a mask “whether you like the mask or not,” he said. “They have an impact,” he added.

“My administration will stop at nothing to save lives … weve learned so much about this disease,” Trump said, adding that the “vaccines are coming … sooner than anyone thought possible.”

“Some areas of our country are doing very well,” Trump said, adding that it “will get worse before it gets better.” He noted that the U.S. medical supply chain is now well-stocked and suggested there are no shortfalls.

The president reiterated that half of COVID-19 deaths are among people who are in nursing homes, while many more have underlying health problems. He cited data showing that among young people and children, the virus has little impact.

“The average age of those who are tested” is significantly lower than those who were tested in April, Trump added. The fatality rate, meanwhile, is “lower than most” other countries, Trump remarked. He said that ventilators from the United States are in high demand across the world.

In previous comments to media outlets, the president said the briefings would be heavily focused on the vaccine and development of drugs to treat the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) virus, a novel coronavirus that emerged in China last year.

Trump Walter Reed Mask
President Donald Trump wears a mask as he visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., on July 11, 2020. (Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images)

Trump held daily briefings with the White House virus task force headed by Vice President Mike Pence, top infectious diseases expert Dr. Anthony Fauci, task force coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx, and other officials from March until April.

“I think its a great way to get information out to the public as to where we are with the vaccine, with the therapeutics, and generally speakRead More From Source

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