Politics

House to Subpoena Postmaster General Over Mail Delays

WASHINGTON—The House Oversight Committee intends to subpoena Postmaster General Louis DeJoy for documents on disruptions in mail delivery operations that are now central to questions over the agencys ability to handle the onslaught of mail-in ballots expected for the November election.

Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.) the committee chair, sent a memo Monday saying DeJoy blew past last weeks deadline to fully respond to the committees request for more information. He has not provided any new materials, she said.

“It is clear that a subpoena has become necessary to further the Committees investigation and help inform potential legislative actions,” she said.

Democrats are aggressively pursuing oversight of postal operations and are leading an unprecedented push to have voters cast their ballots by mail is underway across the nation in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many Republicans, including President Donald Trump, have warned about the negative effects of the push, pointing to the botched Democratic primary election in New York City.

Epoch Times Photo
Pam Fleming and fellow workers stuff ballots and instructions into mail-in envelopes at the Lancaster County Election Committee offices in Lincoln, Neb., on April 14, 2020. (Nati Harnik/AP Photo)

DeJoy, who was tapped to lead the agency in June, said the organizational changes hes made are aimed at making the independent, executive branch agency more efficient.

Communities across the nation complained about widespread disruptions in postal operations this summer as blue mailboxes and sorting equipment were removed and employees said changes in trucking operations and overtime hours left mail on the loading docks, undelivered.

The committee produced internal postal service data showing widespread summer service disruptions.

Postal Service spokeswoman Kimberly Frum previously told The Epoch Times that, for decades, the installation and removal of mail boxes has been based on mail volume received in the boxes.

“It is a fluid process and figures can vary from day-to-day. Historically, mail boxes have been removed for lack of use and installed in growth areas,” she said, adding later: “When a collection box consistently receives very small amounts of mail for months on end, it costs the Postal Service money in fuel and workhours for letter carriers to drive to the mailbox and collect the mail. Removing the box is simply good business sense in that respect.”

The service has in recent years placed a greater emphasis on relocating boxes that arent used much to high-traffic areas such as shopping centers and grocery stores.

Epoch Times Photo
A United States Postal Service (USPS) mailbox stands in the Manhattan, N.Y., on Aug. 5, 2020. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

DeJoy, who testified before the panel earlier this month, reiterated in a letter on Aug. 28 thaRead More From Source

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